Trick or Treat?

Trick or Treat?

Rub my feet!

A Hot Stone Massage

Can’t be beat!

A tiny fat pumpkin

Keep the popcorn,

Save the candy,

Hands on the neck

Make everything dandy!

 

Goblins from your work-day

Put knots in your back,

Gliding hands up and down

Send those knots off the back!

 

Trick or treat?

Rub my feet!

ANY kind of massage

can’t be beat!

 

www.thecomfortzonemassage.com to get YOUR next massage!

 

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Massage and Lower Back Pain

Chronic back pain can cause you to miss out on life.  Maybe you’ve missed work a few times.  You choose weekends on the couch instead of a weekend out doing fun stuff.   If it hurts badly enough you might even go to the doctor (repeatedly).  Pain in the lower back is one of the top reasons people go to the doctor.    A study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in July 2011 found that massage therapy was better than “usual care” at relieving lower back pain.   Funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health, the study’s lead author was Daniel Cherkin, Director of Group Health Research Institute. Could massage therapy help relieve your lower back pain?

The study consisted of 401 patients who were mostly middle-aged females all of whom had chronic low back pain.  The participants were randomly assigned to one of 3 treatment groups:  full body relaxation massage, targeted deep tissue massage, and usual care, defined as medication and physical therapy.  The participants assigned to either massage group each received a one hour massage once a week for ten weeks.   After ten weeks the results were surprising.  Nearly 2/3 of the people who received either type of massage said their back pain was significantly improved or gone.  Only about 1/3 of the “usual care” patients experienced the same type of relief.   Some of the participants in the massage groups even reported improved symptoms up to 6 months later!

The study authors expected to prove that deep tissue, or structural massage would work better for the back pain than relaxation massage, but they discovered that BOTH types of massage are equally effective in relieving lower back pain symptoms.  It didn’t matter which type of massage was received, the symptoms either improved or went away!

Massage therapy can be a gentle, natural alternative to muscle relaxants and pain medications.  Wouldn’t it be great to feel better without taking a bunch of pills?  It is wise to visit a doctor with lower back pain symptoms to rule out certain spinal injuries or abnormalities.  If the pain is musculoskeletal, then massage therapy could be a great way to get moving again.

What helps with your lower back pain? Exercise, rest, massage, medications, or something else? Please share in the comments. Need an appointment? Visit my website! www.thecomfortzonemassage.com

Why am I a Massage Therapist?

I love being a Massage Therapist. My job is exciting, rewarding, and never boring. People often ask me why I became a massage therapist and why I continue to be one.

I got my first massage on a random Saturday morning of my twentieth year. It was the greatest thing I had ever felt in my  life. I couldn’t move. I had drool dripping from my mouth. I had to think about how to tie my shoes. My first massage changed my life.

A couple of years later I got the courage to attend massage school because I wanted to learn how to make people feel the same way.

So why am I still a Massage Therapist?

1. I get to help people feel awesome.

2. I love to see the progress while working with regular clients. My heart soars if they’ve told my a symptom has improved. 🙂

3. I am self-employed. Even though there are days I work long hours and I still work on Saturdays, I have the ability to adjust my schedule in order to meet the needs of my family. (Plus, on a really busy day if I need to rest for 15 minutes I have the perfect room.)

4. I have the opportunity to work with some very special people. My work days are fun and exciting.

5. Stress affects the lives of so many people. Stress over-load can contribute to so many aches, pains and illnesses. I am on a mission to help people improve their quality of life.

6. I enjoy the challenge! The human body is an amazing thing and I get to work with one every day.

7. Continuing Education is a priority for me, both formal and informal. I read every week and take classes every year.

8. I like to help people learn about ways to fight pain and stress.

9. I have clients whose pain would be unbearable if they didn’t get massage. I like to be the one who can give them massage.

10. I like to help people. (Yes, that’s the standard massage school answer, but it’s true.)

11. I get to help people feel awesome!

www.thecomfortzonemassage.com

What is Fibromyalgia? Part 2

In the last post I asked the question, “What is Fibromyalgia?” Then I talked about pain. Long-lasting pain.

People ask me all the time, “What kind of pain?” And the only answer I can give, from my personal experience in my massage practice, is that the pain is different in each person. Clear as mud, right?

According to MayoClinic.com, women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia than men. There is pain that is often joined by fatigue, sleep issues, memory issues, depression and anxiety. So not only does it hurt physically, it hurts emotionally.

I have worked with people whose pain keeps them in bed for days. Each small task seems almost impossible. Loading the washing machine might cause excruciating back pain. Sometimes even lifting a glass to drink might be too painful. It isn’t uncommon to suffer depression, too. Depression, anxiety, and fibromyalgia often have a which-came-first discussion.

Some will say that the pain causes the depression. Others say that severe depression can cause the pain fatigue.

I have also worked with people whose pain isn’t quite so severe. It ebbs and flows.  One woman works out every day to keep the pain mild. Another can only work out when she feels well. It affects each and every person differently, but profoundly.

The pain isn’t consistent throughout the body, either. For some the pain is in the neck and shoulder area with major headaches, poor range of neck motion, and constant pain. Others may have severe lower back pain, knee pain, or arm/hand pain. In some the pain acts like arthritis. Others the pain acts like severe muscle spasms. Most of the people I have worked with have good days with mild to no symptoms, as well as bad days with mild to severe symptoms. Each day can be different.

Treatment plans for fibromyalgia often include antidepressants and pain medications (over the counter or prescription.) Therapy or counseling may help with understanding how to deal with possible life changes. Having a good support system in your life who understands the situation is a tremendous help. Massage therapy, chiropractic and acupuncture could be used in addition to what ever the doctor suggests.

www.thecomfortzonemassage.com