What is Fibromyalgia? Part 2

In the last post I asked the question, “What is Fibromyalgia?” Then I talked about pain. Long-lasting pain.

People ask me all the time, “What kind of pain?” And the only answer I can give, from my personal experience in my massage practice, is that the pain is different in each person. Clear as mud, right?

According to MayoClinic.com, women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia than men. There is pain that is often joined by fatigue, sleep issues, memory issues, depression and anxiety. So not only does it hurt physically, it hurts emotionally.

I have worked with people whose pain keeps them in bed for days. Each small task seems almost impossible. Loading the washing machine might cause excruciating back pain. Sometimes even lifting a glass to drink might be too painful. It isn’t uncommon to suffer depression, too. Depression, anxiety, and fibromyalgia often have a which-came-first discussion.

Some will say that the pain causes the depression. Others say that severe depression can cause the pain fatigue.

I have also worked with people whose pain isn’t quite so severe. It ebbs and flows.  One woman works out every day to keep the pain mild. Another can only work out when she feels well. It affects each and every person differently, but profoundly.

The pain isn’t consistent throughout the body, either. For some the pain is in the neck and shoulder area with major headaches, poor range of neck motion, and constant pain. Others may have severe lower back pain, knee pain, or arm/hand pain. In some the pain acts like arthritis. Others the pain acts like severe muscle spasms. Most of the people I have worked with have good days with mild to no symptoms, as well as bad days with mild to severe symptoms. Each day can be different.

Treatment plans for fibromyalgia often include antidepressants and pain medications (over the counter or prescription.) Therapy or counseling may help with understanding how to deal with possible life changes. Having a good support system in your life who understands the situation is a tremendous help. Massage therapy, chiropractic and acupuncture could be used in addition to what ever the doctor suggests.

www.thecomfortzonemassage.com

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What is Fibromyalgia? Part 1

What is Fibromyalgia?

To the person who suffers it is pain. The kind of pain that keeps you in bed. Pain that never seems to go away. Pain that controls your life. Pain that no one seems to understand.

To the doctor  whom the patient sees it is a challenge. It is an enigma,  an ever-changing target.

To the loved ones of the afflicted it is a worry, a concern, a wish to make things better.

What is Fibromyalgia?

Fibromyalgia:  is a neurosensory disorder characterized by widespread muscle pain, joint stiffness, and fatigue. The condition is chronic (ongoing), but pain comes and goes and moves about the body. The disorder is often misdiagnosed or unrecognized and is and often complicated by mood and anxiety disorders. (found here)

So, really, what IS Fibromyalgia? We can say that it is chronic pain. We can read that the pain moves to different areas of the body. We can hear our loved one say that they cannot get out of bed some days. We hear them but do we understand? Do we really see?

I work with a few people who live with Fibromyalgia. It is SO completely different in each person that I find it hard to define. I read a book once who called it “The Thief.” (I cannot remember the name of the book, sorry.) This woman called Fibromyalgia “The Thief” because is was stealing her life. Day by day. Moment by moment. Pain. Pain that doesn’t go away. It just becomes tolerable.

I’ve worked with clients whose doctors told them that their pain wasn’t real. They were told to “get over it,” and “we can’t find anything wrong with you, but you’re depressed.” They were given pills and sent home feeling defeated and crazy.

But you don’t need to feel crazy because Fibromyalgia is real. And it hurts. And you very well may be depressed.

I’ve also seen clients whose doctors were amazingly empathetic. The doctors worked with them to try to find solutions for the pain – pain meds, physical therapy, antidepressants, massage therapy, spiritual therapy, and counseling.  Even if the pain didn’t go away the patient had the confidence that comes with being heard and believed.

The next post, maybe two, I will explore in more detail this “Thief” named Fibroyalgia.

www.thecomfortzonemassage.com for more information about the type of Massage Therapy I offer.